Home > Art-Culture-Architecture, Government > UK Arts leaders voice deep concerns over lack of cultural subjects in Ebacc.

UK Arts leaders voice deep concerns over lack of cultural subjects in Ebacc.

By , chief arts writer The Guardian, Friday 2nd November 2012.

Government urged to rethink ‘incredibly shortsighted’ policy amid fears about impact on schools and the creative economy.

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Grayson Perry

Artist Grayson Perry is among those who says they are deeply worried about the impact of the government’s policy. Photograph: Jonathan Hordle/Rex Features

Britain’s creative economy could be destroyed “within a generation” because of the decision to leave arts subjects out of the English baccalaureate, according to leading figures in the arts world.

Sir Nicholas Hytner, Sir Nicholas Serota, Julian Lloyd Webber, Richard Rogers, Sir David Hare and Grayson Perry are among the cultural figureheads who have told the Guardian they are deeply worried about the impact of excluding creative subjects from the core qualification at 16. There are fears that many schools, particularly state schools, will marginalise arts subjects if they do not count towards the Ebacc, the new GCSE performance measure.

The film and theatre director Sir Richard Eyre called the lack of arts on the Ebacc “incredibly shortsighted” while the playwright Sir David Hare condemned the policy as “the most dangerous and far-reaching of the government’s reforms”.

The architect Lord Rogers added: “Our writers, artists, designers, dancers, actors and architects are the envy of the world. Arts education should definitely not be marginalised or censored.” Thomas Adès, the composer whose opera The Tempest is currently at the Metropolitan Opera in New York, called the move “suicidal, if we want to have any arts at all in Britain in 30 years”. Mandatory school music lessons had “made all the difference” to him.

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