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Cambodia’s vast lost city: world’s greatest pre-industrial site unearthed.

By Lara Dunston  June 28th 2013.   Find Article Here:-

A ground-breaking archaeological discovery in Cambodia has revealed a colossal 700-year old urban landscape connecting ancient cities and temples to Angkor Wat. Lara Dunston joins the excavation team for the first site visit by a British newspaper.

Pre Rup temple at Angkor, Cambodia View larger picture

Pre Rup temple at Angkor, Cambodia. Photograph: Terence Carter. Click on the magnifying glass icon to see a larger version of this image

It’s 7am at Angkor Wat and there’s not a tourist in sight. It’s blissfully quiet, the first clear June morning after two days of torrential rains. The only souls around are a small group of Buddhist pilgrims, lighting incense at the rear of the spectacular Khmer temple. The bleary-eyed early-risers, who woke in darkness to board tour buses to Angkor archaeological park for sunrise photo ops, have already trundled back to their breakfast buffets.

I’m not here for sightseeing, however, I’m heading further into the forest surrounding the stupendous temple complex with Australian archaeologist Dr Damian Evans to meet the archaeologists from Cambodia, the Philippines and the USA, who are working on new excavations.

The release this month by the US National Academy of Sciences of a report on the results of a high-tech survey of Khmer Empire sites, undertaken in April 2012, has rocked the archaeological world and captured travellers’ imaginations.

A monumental, sophisticated, densely populated urban landscape, which dates back more than 700 years, has been identified. It includes and connects Angkor cities such as Angkor Wat, Angkor Thom and Bayon, with the rarely visited medieval city ruins of Phnom Kulen, Beng Mealea and Koh Ker, over 100km away.

Srah Damrie, Siem Reap archaeology, Mount Kulen

Srah Damrie, Siem Reap archaeology, Mount Kulen. Photograph: /Terence Carter
Evans was one of the report authors and the lead archaeologist and director of the project, which only became known outside local and archaeological circles with the release of the report this month.As we make our way through dense vegetation, he explains how eight key archaeological groups, including the Cambodian government’s Apsara Authority, which manages archaeological sites, collaborated on the project. It began with the survey using an airborne laser scanning instrument called Lidar, strapped to a helicopter, to search for ruins and other structures (the size of the area covered by the helicopter doing the survey was 320 sq km). Developed in the 1990s, it’s only recently that the technology has matured to the level where it can penetrate dense vegetation and provide extremely detailed models of the forest floor.”For archaeologists, these lumps and bumps that we see in the forest, each has a meaning,” Evans explains, pointing out gentle mounds. “These are all the traces of the civilisation of the city associated with Angkor Wat, made of wood and thatch, that has disappeared. It’s these contours that remain inscribed into the forest landscape we study.”

Smoke wafts from the fires lit to keep mosquitoes at bay. Dotted between the mounds are several rectangular holes in the ground where Dr Miriam Stark from the University of Hawaii and her team are at work.

“We’re really interested in understanding residence patterns, where and how people lived and who they were,” Stark explains excitedly, showing me X-ray-like images of the area we’re in. “Before, it took more than three intensive weeks of [preparation] before we knew where to dig. Now, with Lidar, it’s as if you just peel a layer off and it’s there!” With clipboards and pens in hand, the team records a wealth of discoveries, such as shards of Ming Dynasty ceramics.

Ta Prohm Temple, Siem Reap

Ta Prohm Temple, Siem Reap. Photograph: Terence Cartere
Scholars have based their idea of all medieval cities around the world on European cities, explains Professor Roland Fletcher, director of the Greater Angkor Project. But now, it seems there was a colossal low-density urban sprawl here, a conurbation of different places with massive working citadels with enormous infrastructure. Remote temples cities like Koh Ker, 120km from Siem Reap, and Beng Mealea, 52km away, once thought of as isolated, would have been large outlying service centres for Angkor within a huge hinterland.”This is a highly managed system, the most extensive pre-industrial city in the world,” he says, though referring to its complexity rather than its size. “The Lidar results show there were three cities [here] at the end of the 9th century – the largest was on top of Mount Kulen, creating an [equivalent to] industrial 19th-century Britain.”The city is so enormous it is unlikely to ever exist as one excavated site, but tourism here is likely to increase. There’s talk of a cutting-edge museum presenting the exciting new discoveries, new archaeological sites in the future, and greater interest in little-visited outlying temples already accessible to the public.

We decide to head to one of these Phnom Kulen, a site rarely visited by tourists, with just a few companies offering expeditions and treks there.

“Phnom Kulen is a sacred mountain, a holy place for Cambodians,” Tat, our guide from Backyard Travel tells us en route. His ancestors called this place Mahendraparvata, or the Mountain of Indra, King of the Gods. “We call it the Mountain of the Lychees now. Look, you can see it here,” he says, pointing to a long, low, flat plateau that barely rises above the palms, banana plants and rubber trees that skirt the road and hug the traditional stilted timber houses dotting the lush emerald-green countryside.

Siem Reap composite

Carvings at Ta Nei Temple, Siem Reap and at Srah Damrie, Mount Kulen. Photograph: Terence Carter
Phnom Kulen may not be the dramatic mist-shrouded peak I imagined, yet the 492m-high, 8km-wide and 32km-long mountain is visible for the whole 90-minute drive north from Siem Reap to the foothills of Mount Kulen national park. We intend to hike to the summit, and the remains of the three-tiered temple of Prasat Rong Chen that marks the site where the Khmer Empire was founded in AD 802, when a Brahmin priest declared Jayavarman II universal monarch – just two years after Charlemagne was made Holy Roman Emperor – will be nothing less than dramatic.Mahendraparvata was never really “lost” – the mountain has long been known as the location of the sandstone quarries that built Angkor’s cities, as well as the source of water for a complex system that irrigated the vast empire. When we visit, people are wading in the River of A Thousand Lingas, a section of the stream boasting stone carvings on its floor. Villagers frequently stumble across finds, recently some bronze, copper and sandstone statues of Hindu gods Vishnu, Shiva and Lakshmi. But the Lidar survey confirmed that Mahendraparvata was part of a city, and much larger than suspected – maybe as big as present-day Phnom Penh.We leave our air-conditioned four-wheel drive behind and soon we’re bouncing along muddy tracks on the back of motorbikes behind guides familiar with the landmine-riddled mountainside, that was the last stronghold of the Khmer Rouge.

Workers on a dig at Angkor Wat

Workers on a dig at Angkor Wat. Photograph: Terence Carter
They lead us towards the summit. It’s a slow journey, over narrow, bumpy dirt trails – only the most intrepid travellers come here. We cross log bridges and ride straight through flowing streams. Scattered across the mountain are ruined, foliage-covered temples, ancient highway markers and, at Sras Damrei or Elephant Pond, massive statues of an elephant and lions. The thought that more sites like this could soon be discovered is thrilling.Back in Siem Reap we take to the air in a helicopter to get a better idea of what this urban landscape might have looked like. Had I taken the flight two weeks’ ago, I would have gasped at the magnificence of the isolated temple structures with their imposing walls and moats surrounded by forests. Now, I see patterns of bumps and lines on the vast floodplain as beautiful remnants of an immense, effervescent city that technology and archaeology are finally bringing to life.While many believe this site will become one of Asia‘s greatest wonders, and tourism bodies are eager to see excavations progress quickly and more archaeological sites opened up to visitors, the extraordinary size of the area means work will be costly and take years. In the meantime, however, the intrepid can play at being Indiana Jones at undeveloped sites on Phnom Kulen, and temple cities such as Beng Mealea and Koh Ker – and let their imaginations run wild.

Backyard Travel offers one-day expeditions to Mount Kulen for $136pp, and day trips to Koh Ker and Beng Mealea for $126. Shinta Mani Hotel (+855 63 761 998) provided rooms; prices start from $170 B&B. HeliStar offers flights over Angkor, including Mount Kulen and Koh Ker, starting from $90pp

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Sellafield fined £700,000 for sending radioactive waste to UK landfill.

The Guardian, Friday 14th June 2013.      Find Article Here:-

Court also orders nuclear company to pay £72,000 costs for mistake which sent low-level waste to wrong site.

Sellafield nuclear site in Cumbria

The Sellafield nuclear site’s operators mistakenly sent bags of low-level waste to a nearby landfill in Cumbria. Photograph: Christopher Thomond

The nuclear company Sellafield Ltd has been fined £700,000 and ordered to pay more than £72,000 costs for sending bags of radioactive waste to a landfill site.

The bags, which contained waste such as plastic, tissues and clothing, should have been sent to a specialist facility that treats and stores low-level radioactive waste, but management and operational failings led to them being sent to Lillyhall landfill site in Workington, Cumbria.

This breached the conditions of the company’s environmental permit and the Carriage of Dangerous Goods and Use of Transportable Pressure Equipment Regulations.

At Carlisle crown court the company, which runs the Sellafield reprocessing site in Cumbria, was fined £700,000 and ordered to pay £72,635.34 costs.

Sellafield found the error had been caused by the wrong configuration of a new monitor which passed the bags as general waste, making them exempt from strict disposal controls.

The Environment Agency and the Office for Nuclear Regulation carried out an investigation and the bags were retrieved from the landfill and returned to Sellafield for correct disposal.

Ian Parker, the nuclear regulation manager for the Environment Agency, said: “Our overriding aim in regulating the nuclear industry is to protect people and the environment from the release of radioactive wastes into the environment.

“While this incident did not lead to any significant harm being caused to the public or to the environment, the failings by Sellafield Ltd that led to the incident were serious and we consider that on this occasion, Sellafield Ltd fell well short of the high standards which we expec.

“For us, the most important thing is that Sellafield Ltd has learnt the lessons from this and put improvements in place to minimise the chances of this type of incident happening again.”

Ian Barlow from the Office for Nuclear Regulation said: “We require the nuclear industry to control its hazards and ensure it has effective procedures in place for transporting and disposing of all forms of radioactive material, including waste.

“That hasn’t happened here – a failure in leadership and management resulted in the uncontrolled transport and disposal of low-level waste in the public domain.

“Our decision to prosecute shows that this will not be tolerated. Where it is necessary to do so, ONR will not hesitate to take enforcement action to ensure the protection of people and society from the hazards of the nuclear industry.”

Categories: Environment, Government, Health

Urgent review launched into UK bee population decline .

By Emily Beament   28th June 2013.     Find Article Here:-

The UK Government is launching an “urgent and comprehensive” review of why bees are declining and what is being done to help them.

Many species of bee and other pollinating insects including butterflies, moths and hoverflies have experienced declines in recent decades, raising concerns about the impacts on food supplies, gardens and the countryside.

Factors including use of pesticides, loss of habitat and more intensive agriculture are thought to be to blame.

The review will look at current policies, the evidence on what is happening to pollinators and what action charities and businesses are taking to help the insects, Environment Minister Lord de Mauley will announce in a speech.

The work will identify what needs to be done to help bees and other insects, and will form the basis of a “national pollinator strategy” which will bring together all the initiatives already under way and help develop new action.

Lord de Mauley will tell a Bee Summit organised by Friends of the Earth: “We must develop a better understanding of the factors that can harm these insects and the changes that government, other organisations and individuals can make to help.”

The Government has come under fire for opposing European moves to ban “neonicotinoid” pesticides which have been linked to bee declines, but Lord de Mauley said bees would be vulnerable with or without restrictions on insecticides.

“I do not deny for a moment that it is important to regulate pesticides effectively and to avoid unnecessary pesticide use.”

But he will tell the conference: “Changes in land use, the type of crops grown, alien species, climate change – these all have an impact. The relative importance of these factors and their interactions is not well understood.”

The review will begin with the launch of a report on current government policy and initiatives in England, while in September a series of workshops will bring experts together to discuss the issue.

And independent experts will look at the evidence on the state of UK pollinating insects, he will announce.

Friends of the Earth’s executive director Andy Atkins said: “We’re delighted that enormous pressure for a Bee Action Plan from scientists, businesses and the public has stung the Government into action.

“We all agree prompt measures are needed to tackle all the threats bees and other pollinators face, but an urgent and comprehensive route map and timetable are needed to ensure this happens.

“The Minister’s plan of action must be in place when bees emerge from hibernation next spring – we can’t afford to gamble any longer with our food, countryside and economy.”

Categories: Environment, Government

Snowden: Shooting the Messenger.

By Stephen Lendman    28th June 2013.    Find Full Article Here:-

A previous article said challenging US lawlessness more than ever matters. Big Brother spying reflects it. Unprecedented global surveillance is official US policy.

Everyone can be monitored all the time, everywhere, for any reason or none at all. National security threats are fabricated. America’s only enemies are ones it creates.

The ACLU said “(i)t’s time to get angry. (It’s) “Time to Rein in the Surveillance State.” Stop lawless US spying. Mega-data-mining’s unconstitutional.

“This unprecedented surveillance strikes at the core of our right to free speech, association, and privacy.”

“On June 10, 2013, the ACLU filed a motion with the FISA Court seeking the release of its secret opinions that enable the mass acquisition of phone records.”

Anything goes is policy. Hegemons make their own rules. They operate extrajudicially. Snowden revealed what everyone needs to know. He did so heroically. He’s vilified for doing the right thing.

He’s wrongfully charged under the 1917 Espionage Act. It’s a WW I era relic. It’s used irresponsibly to silence dissent. It targets whistleblowers. Washington calls Snowden a fugitive. He exposed government espionage. He didn’t commit it.

The White House warned Russia not to release him. It wants him arrested and extradited. Vladimir Putin won’t roll over. He was clear and unequivocal.

“He’s a free man,” he said. He can do whatever he wishes. He’s a human rights defender. Moscow won’t hand him over. He’s wrongfully judged guilty by accusation.

He’ll be brutalized in America’s hands. Maybe he’ll be killed to silence him. House Speaker and other congressional members called him a traitor.

They accused him of treason. They did so irresponsibly. They’re guilty of high crimes. Changing the narrative targets Snowden.

An unnamed senior Obama official said:

“Mr. Snowden’s claim that he is focussed on supporting transparency, freedom of the press, and protection of individual rights and democracy is belied by the protectors he has potentially chosen: China, Russia, Cuba, Venezuela, and Ecuador.”

“His failure to criticize these regimes suggests that his true motive throughout has been to injure the national security of the US, not to advance Internet freedom and free speech.”

Snowden: An exercise in disinformation.

By Stuart J. Hooper  25th June 2013.    Find Full Article Here:-

Over the past week, many have embraced Edward Snowden as a ‘hero’, including a vast majority of people who purport to be in the ‘alternative media’ – all of whom would usually question what the mainstream news corporations present to them.

Numerous questions and concerns have been raised, albeit by a vocal minority, about the reality of what Snowden represents. Those who would usually be the ones to join this vocal minority in search for real answers, namely the aforementioned majority of alternative media personalities, appear to have been duped into jumping onto the latest staged bandwagon hero, along with large numbers of a naïve general public.

Edward Snowden’s leaks and scandals can be explained as a highly sophisticated, disinformation project of the highest order. Disinformation being defined as false information deliberately, and covertly, spread in order to influence public opinion (Merriam-Webster, 2013).

Historian Dr. Webster Tarpley (2013) has already noted that in 1620 a Venetian intelligence official recommended ‘saying something good about a person or institution while pretending to say something bad’. Tarpley provides the example of ‘criticizing a bloody dictator for beating his dog – the real dimensions of his crimes are thus totally underplayed’. So, we should be against the bloody dictator beating his dog, but ought to be more concerned with the more substantial crimes the ‘bloody dictator’ is known for. The scandals provided by Snowden are of an equivalent standard to the example of the dictator beating a dog. While we should be against unwarranted spying, this new scandal looks to distract us from the greater, and significantly more important, context of global affairs that are currently focused on Syria.

Snowden can be described here as an actor in a ‘limited hangout’ operation. Limited hangouts are described as when an intelligence agency resorts ‘to admitting, sometimes even volunteering, some of the truth while still managing to withhold the key and damaging facts in the case’ (Marchetti, 1978). This coincides with the first of Tarpley’s (2013) three conceptual identifiers for a limited hangout operation – the revelation of little information that is actually new. Simply put, Snowden has told us that the NSA is spying on emails and telephone calls (Drury and Robinson, 2013), along with revelations that international super powers spy on one another (Chen, 2013). While this may be shocking to some, these revelations can hardly be detailed as ‘new’ or ‘ground-breaking’. Snowden has simply provided a name, PRISM, for what has already been understood to be going on for some time. This is somewhat similar to how Julian Assange of Wikileaks rose to fame after providing the graphic video for an already acknowledged incident. These new slivers of information can, however, be particularly impactful as Marchetti (1978) notes, ‘the public is usually so intrigued by the new information that it never thinks to pursue the matter further’. Not pursuing Snowden further may have disastrous consequences for world peace and security.

For the press, it all makes perfect sense on the surface, and the surface is where the press operates. A deeper look, however, reveals the full picture…

The second conceptual identifier Tarpley (2013) provides for recognising a limited hangout operation is that the actors involved, Snowden and Assange for example, will become ‘instant media darlings’. A naïve view would suggest that this occurs due to the magnitude of information the person is presenting. Reality would show that when providing a critique of controversial issues that truly matter to the ‘Wall Street centered US ruling class’ (Tarpley, 2013), such a 9/11, that these critics are slandered, attacked and denigrated. It is also interesting to note that these limited hangout actors have themselves participated in the attacking of 9/11 truth activists. Assange has provided the most scolding attack stating ‘I’m constantly annoyed that people are distracted by false conspiracies such as 9/11’ (Bell, 2010). Glenn Greenwald, who brought Snowden forward, is not interested in veering from the official 9/11 story and instead focuses on ‘blowback’ being the cause of terrorism (Greenwald, 2013). Norman Solomon, a former U.S. State Department asset who is now supporting Snowden, ‘was notorious ten years ago as a determined enemy of 9/11 truth’ (Tarpley, 2013). The magnitude of the 9/11 issue is reflected in the authoritative status of those who question the official story such as: Andreas von Bülow, the former secretary of state for the German Federal Ministry of Defence, and Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the former president of Iran. It must be asked why these ‘whistle-blowers’ seem so vehemently opposed to the issue of questioning the biggest elephant in the room per say – 9/11, and why they never have any new information to reveal regarding the event. They all appear to agree with the establishment, that they proclaim to be fighting against, on what is arguable the most important and controversial event in recent history; which provides much cause for concern.

These concerns are somewhat amplified when the characteristics of Snowden are looked at in detail. Naomi Wolf (2013) has stated that during his interview he looked like ‘someone who had learned his talking points’ and his message promoted fears that an oppressive government would want to instil in other would-be whistle-blowers; such as the idea that you will lose everything by standing up against it, in effect, demonstrating the omnipotent capacity of said government. Doubts have also been raised about whether Snowden had the ability to wiretap the president and shut down the NSA in a few hours, as he has claimed (Rappoport, 2013). These claims might be attributed to Snowden’s apparent narcissistic tendencies, most evident in modelling photographs and an online biography of his that have now been published (Reilly, 2013). Snowden is known to have enlisted in the U.S. Army in May 2004 where he wanted to fight for freedom in a Special Forces unit. Tarpley (2013) states that this ‘shift from militarist to civil libertarian remains unexplained and highly suspicious’, a conclusion that is substantiated by the other added character concerns.

How to shield all your electronic communications from the NSA.

By J. D. Heyes  June 25th 2013.      Find Article Here:-

In the wake of recent revelations that the National Security Agency (NSA) and other government snoops are monitoring the electronic communications of U.S. citizens, millions of us wanted to know what, if anything, we could do to protect our email, cell phone conversations, chat sessions from Big Brother in the future.

Now, granted, the technological capabilities of the NSA are massive. And, as was revealed in subsequent news reports following the initial revelations about the NSA, tech companies and Internet Service Providers are in cahoots with the government, so they’re not going to protect you. Further, the Fourth Amendment appears to mean nothing to the Obama Aadministration.

What’s a poor, hapless citizen to do? First off, take a deep breath and read on. There are things you can do.

‘Pretty Good Privacy’

Per Slate:

Not every communication can be tracked and eavesdropped on by the government, however, and there are ways to reduce the chances of being snooped on. First, instead of browsing the Internet in a way that reveals your IP address, you can mask your identity by using an anonymizing tool like Tor (https://www.torproject.org) or by connecting to the Web using a Virtual Private Network (https://www.torproject.org). Additionally, you can avoid Google search by using an alternative like Ixquick (https://ixquick.com/eng/), which has solid privacy credentials and says it does not log any IP addresses or search terms or share information with third parties.

Want to send protected email? You can do that as well. If you happen to be using a commercial email provider like Google, Yahoo! or another service identified as having been co-opted by PRISM, the NSA’s snoop program, you can certainly slow down the agency by sending and receiving emails encrypted with PGP (Pretty Good Privacy), which has been around for years, or a free alternative, GPG (http://www.gnupg.org/). Both of these products can be used to encrypt and decrypt email messages – unless, however, you have Trojan spyware installed on your machine.

“Novice computer users learning how to use PGP or GPG may find it a daunting prospect at first, but there are plenty of tutorials online for both Mac and Windows users that can help guide you through the process,” says Slate

If you happen to be a journalist and you are working with confidential sources or an attorney seeking to protect attorney-client conversations – or if you just require security communications – learning how to use either of these protective programs will be a must in the near- and long-term.

Organizations or firms could go even further and stop using a third-party service and instead set up their own email server, “helping ensure no secret court orders can be filed to gain covert access to confidential files,” Slate reports. Private documents can be stored online, if necessary, and kept shielded using Cloudfogger (http://www.cloudfogger.com/en/) in conjunction with Dropbox.

Instant messaging and phone or video chats can be better protected if you avoid using Microsoft and Google-based services such as Skype and Gchat and instead adopt more secure forms of communication. Those include Jitsi (https://jitsi.org/), which can be utilized for peer-to-peer calls video calls that are encrypted.

Set-up takes some time but it’ll be worth it

For encrypted instant message chats you could try an “off the record” plugin like Pidgin (http://www.pidgin.im/) for Windows users and Adium (http://adium.im/) for Mac machines.

For instant messaging and online phone or video chats, you can avoid Microsoft and Google services like Skype and Gchat by adopting more secure alternatives. Jitsi can be used for peer-to-peer encrypted video calls, and for encrypted instant message chats you can try using an “off the record” plugin with Pidgin for Windows users or Adium for Mac.

“Like using PGP encryption, both Pidgin and Adium can take a little bit of work to set up – but there are tutorials to help ease the pain, like this (www.encrypteverything.ca) for setting up Adium and this (https://securityinabox.org/en/pidgin_securechat) tutorial for Pidgin,” Slate notes.

Technology advances have made it nearly effortless for governments to spy on citizens. While this practice is common in other countries, the U.S. Constitution, under the Fourth Amendment, absolutely prohibits the kind of blanket surveillance being conducted by the NSA. That the agency received permission to do so from the FISA court – which conducts its business in secret – is not the same thing as having the authority to do so. If that were the case federal courts could grant any number of federal agencies permission to violate every single provision of the Constitution.

That said, it is highly unlikely those responsible for ordering the NSA to spy on American citizens are going to be reprimanded, so the best thing you can do in the meantime is protect your electronic communications as best as you can.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.slate.com

https://www.torproject.org

https://ixquick.com/eng/

A new giant vaccine scandal exposes government lies and psyops.

By Jon Rappoport  June 17th 2013.      Find Full Article Here:-

If you control the use of words and numbers, you can make trillions of dollars, and you can hide scandals that would otherwise take you down into infamy and prison.

You can pretty much operate a whole sector of society and remain untouched.

Nowhere is this more clear than in the criminal work of the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

The real name of that agency should be: Centers for Disease Information Control. That’s what they do. They manipulate words and numbers to present fictional images to the public.

They’re a tax-funded PR front for the medical cartel. A 24/7 psyop.

“Yes, of course I’m a criminal. I work for the CDC.”

Here is the latest blockbuster.

After writing about fake vaccine science since 1988, I thought I’d seen it all:

Wild falsehoods about vaccines creating immunity; suppressed information about toxic ingredients in the shots; the absence of proper controlled studies proving vaccines are safe and effective.

But now Peter Doshi, PhD, writing in the online BMJ (British Medical Journal), reveals a new monstrosity. It’s all based on the revelation that most “flu” is not the flu.

Follow this closely. If you blink, you might miss it.

You see, as Doshi states, every year, hundreds of thousands of respiratory samples are taken from flu patients in the US and tested in labs. Here is the kicker: only a small percentage of these samples show the presence of a flu virus.

This means: most of the people in America who are diagnosed by doctors with the flu have no flu virus in their bodies.

So they don’t have the flu.

Therefore, even if you assume the flu vaccine is useful and safe, it couldn’t possibly prevent all those “flu cases” that aren’t flu cases. The vaccine couldn’t possibly work.

The vaccine isn’t designed to prevent fake flu, unless pigs can fly.

Actually, most flu cases are “bacteria cases,” “fungal cases,” or “pollution cases,” or “tainted food” cases, or “eating GMO cases,” or something else. But they aren’t the flu.

Here’s the exact quote from Peter Doshi’s BMJ review, “ Influenza: marketing vaccines by marketing disease” (BMJ 2013; 346:f3037):

But perhaps the cleverest aspect of the influenza marketing strategy surrounds the claim that ‘flu’ and ‘influenza’ are the same. The distinction seems subtle, and purely semantic. But general lack of awareness of the difference might be the primary reason few people realize that even the ideal influenza vaccine, matched perfectly to circulating strains of wild influenza and capable of stopping all influenza viruses, can only deal with a small part of the ‘flu’ problem because most ‘flu’ appears to have nothing to do with influenza. Every year, hundreds of thousands of respiratory specimens are tested across the US. Of those tested, on average 16% are found to be influenza positive.

…It’s no wonder so many people feel that ‘flu shots’ don’t work: for most flus, they can’t.

Because most diagnosed cases of the flu aren’t the flu.

So even if you’re a true believer in mainstream vaccine theory, you’re on the short end of the stick here. They’re conning your socks off.

Doshi points out the wordplay distinction between “flu” and “influenza.” But let’s go even simpler and say: most of the time, diagnosed flu isn’t flu. Period.

In an ethical world, medical researchers and bureaucrats would blow the whistle. They’d say, “Hey, we’re diagnosing huge numbers of people with the flu, but that turns out to be a meaningless term, because they don’t have an influenza virus. So they couldn’t have the flu. These fake ‘flu cases’ couldn’t have benefited from any flu vaccine under the sun BECAUSE THE PATIENTS DON’T HAVE THE FLU.”

But the whistle isn’t blown. Too much money and too many reputations are riding on ignoring the obvious truth.

A patient walks into a doctor’s office. He’s sick. He’s coughing. He has a fever. His muscles ache. The doctor says, “You have the flu. Did you get your flu shot this year?”

“No,” the patient says.

The doctor gives him a stern look. “Well, you should have. See? You’re sick now. The vaccine would have prevented that.”

Wrong.

Again, even by conventional standards, the odds are very high the vaccine would have made no difference at all. Because the odds are very high this patient doesn’t have an influenza virus.

Overwhelmingly, doctors diagnose the flu with a casual eyeball glance. The patient has a familiar cluster of symptoms? It’s flu season? Okay, it’s the flu. Period.

With an ongoing blizzard of psyop-marketing, people accept “flu” and react emotionally to the propaganda about it.

Another branch of that propaganda is delivered to frighten Americans into getting a flu shot: the CDC persistently claims that, every year in the US, 36,000 people die of the flu. We’ve all read and heard that figure, over and over.

It’s a “necessary” statistic for the CDC. They need to promote it. They need to convince the population that seasonal flu is dangerous.

The American people don’t understand that it’s a lie, a grossly manufactured delusion that bears no resemblance to reality.

In December of 2005, the British Medical Journal (online) published another shocking report by Peter Doshi, which spelled out the delusion, and created tremors throughout the halls of the CDC.

Here is a quote from Doshi’s report:

[According to CDC statistics], ‘influenza and pneumonia’ took 62,034 lives in 2001—61,777 of which were attributable to pneumonia and 257 to flu, and in only 18 cases was the flu virus positively identified.

You see, the CDC has created one category that combines flu and pneumonia deaths. Why do they do this? Because they disingenuously assume that the pneumonia deaths are complications stemming from the flu.

This is an absurd assumption. Pneumonia has a number of causes.

But even worse, in all the flu and pneumonia deaths, only 18 revealed the presence of an influenza virus.

Therefore, the CDC could not say, with assurance, that more than 18 people died of influenza in 2001. Not 36,000 deaths. 18 deaths.

Doshi continues his assessment of published CDC flu-death statistics: “Between 1979 and 2001, [CDC] data show an average of 1348 [flu] deaths per year (range 257 to 3006).” These figures refer to flu separated out from pneumonia.

This death toll is obviously far lower than the parroted 36,000 figure. However, when you add the sensible condition that lab tests have to actually find the flu virus in patients, the numbers of flu deaths plummet even further.

In other words, it’s all promotion and hype.