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The US Budget……

October 22nd 2013.

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Categories: Cartoons

The ocean is broken.

By Greg Ray  October 18th  Find Article Here:-  http://www.theherald.com.au/story/1848433/the-ocean-is-broken/?cs=12

Ivan Macfadyen aboard the Funnel Web. Picture by Max Mason-Hubers

Ivan Macfadyen aboard the Funnel Web. Picture by Max Mason-Hubers

IT was the silence that made this voyage different from all of those before it.

Not the absence of sound, exactly.

The wind still whipped the sails and whistled in the rigging. The waves still sloshed against the fibreglass hull.

And there were plenty of other noises: muffled thuds and bumps and scrapes as the boat knocked against pieces of debris.

What was missing was the cries of the seabirds which, on all previous similar voyages, had surrounded the boat.

The birds were missing because the fish were missing.

Exactly 10 years before, when Newcastle yachtsman Ivan Macfadyen had sailed exactly the same course from Melbourne to Osaka, all he’d had to do to catch a fish from the ocean between Brisbane and Japan was throw out a baited line.

“There was not one of the 28 days on that portion of the trip when we didn’t catch a good-sized fish to cook up and eat with some rice,” Macfadyen recalled.

But this time, on that whole long leg of sea journey, the total catch was two.

No fish. No birds. Hardly a sign of life at all.

“In years gone by I’d gotten used to all the birds and their noises,” he said.

“They’d be following the boat, sometimes resting on the mast before taking off again. You’d see flocks of them wheeling over the surface of the sea in the distance, feeding on pilchards.”

But in March and April this year, only silence and desolation surrounded his boat, Funnel Web, as it sped across the surface of a haunted ocean.

North of the equator, up above New Guinea, the ocean-racers saw a big fishing boat working a reef in the distance.

“All day it was there, trawling back and forth. It was a big ship, like a mother-ship,” he said.

And all night it worked too, under bright floodlights. And in the morning Macfadyen was awoken by his crewman calling out, urgently, that the ship had launched a speedboat.

“Obviously I was worried. We were unarmed and pirates are a real worry in those waters. I thought, if these guys had weapons then we were in deep trouble.”

But they weren’t pirates, not in the conventional sense, at least. The speedboat came alongside and the Melanesian men aboard offered gifts of fruit and jars of jam and preserves.

“And they gave us five big sugar-bags full of fish,” he said.

“They were good, big fish, of all kinds. Some were fresh, but others had obviously been in the sun for a while.

“We told them there was no way we could possibly use all those fish. There were just two of us, with no real place to store or keep them. They just shrugged and told us to tip them overboard. That’s what they would have done with them anyway, they said.

“They told us that his was just a small fraction of one day’s by-catch. That they were only interested in tuna and to them, everything else was rubbish. It was all killed, all dumped. They just trawled that reef day and night and stripped it of every living thing.”

Macfadyen felt sick to his heart. That was one fishing boat among countless more working unseen beyond the horizon, many of them doing exactly the same thing.

No wonder the sea was dead. No wonder his baited lines caught nothing. There was nothing to catch.

If that sounds depressing, it only got worse.

The next leg of the long voyage was from Osaka to San Francisco and for most of that trip the desolation was tinged with nauseous horror and a degree of fear.

“After we left Japan, it felt as if the ocean itself was dead,” Macfadyen said.

“We hardly saw any living things. We saw one whale, sort of rolling helplessly on the surface with what looked like a big tumour on its head. It was pretty sickening.

“I’ve done a lot of miles on the ocean in my life and I’m used to seeing turtles, dolphins, sharks and big flurries of feeding birds. But this time, for 3000 nautical miles there was nothing alive to be seen.”

In place of the missing life was garbage in astounding volumes.

“Part of it was the aftermath of the tsunami that hit Japan a couple of years ago. The wave came in over the land, picked up an unbelievable load of stuff and carried it out to sea. And it’s still out there, everywhere you look.”

Ivan’s brother, Glenn, who boarded at Hawaii for the run into the United States, marvelled at the “thousands on thousands” of yellow plastic buoys. The huge tangles of synthetic rope, fishing lines and nets. Pieces of polystyrene foam by the million. And slicks of oil and petrol, everywhere.

Countless hundreds of wooden power poles are out there, snapped off by the killer wave and still trailing their wires in the middle of the sea.

“In years gone by, when you were becalmed by lack of wind, you’d just start your engine and motor on,” Ivan said.

Not this time.

“In a lot of places we couldn’t start our motor for fear of entangling the propeller in the mass of pieces of rope and cable. That’s an unheard of situation, out in the ocean.

“If we did decide to motor we couldn’t do it at night, only in the daytime with a lookout on the bow, watching for rubbish.

“On the bow, in the waters above Hawaii, you could see right down into the depths. I could see that the debris isn’t just on the surface, it’s all the way down. And it’s all sizes, from a soft-drink bottle to pieces the size of a big car or truck.

“We saw a factory chimney sticking out of the water, with some kind of boiler thing still attached below the surface. We saw a big container-type thing, just rolling over and over on the waves.

“We were weaving around these pieces of debris. It was like sailing through a garbage tip.

“Below decks you were constantly hearing things hitting against the hull, and you were constantly afraid of hitting something really big. As it was, the hull was scratched and dented all over the place from bits and pieces we never saw.”

Plastic was ubiquitous. Bottles, bags and every kind of throwaway domestic item you can imagine, from broken chairs to dustpans, toys and utensils.

And something else. The boat’s vivid yellow paint job, never faded by sun or sea in years gone past, reacted with something in the water off Japan, losing its sheen in a strange and unprecedented way.

BACK in Newcastle, Ivan Macfadyen is still coming to terms with the shock and horror of the voyage.

“The ocean is broken,” he said, shaking his head in stunned disbelief.

Recognising the problem is vast, and that no organisations or governments appear to have a particular interest in doing anything about it, Macfadyen is looking for ideas.

He plans to lobby government ministers, hoping they might help.

More immediately, he will approach the organisers of Australia’s major ocean races, trying to enlist yachties into an international scheme that uses volunteer yachtsmen to monitor debris and marine life.

Macfadyen signed up to this scheme while he was in the US, responding to an approach by US academics who asked yachties to fill in daily survey forms and collect samples for radiation testing – a significant concern in the wake of the tsunami and consequent nuclear power station failure in Japan.

“I asked them why don’t we push for a fleet to go and clean up the mess,” he said.

“But they said they’d calculated that the environmental damage from burning the fuel to do that job would be worse than just leaving the debris there.”

Categories: Environment, Health

28 Signs That The US West Coast Is Being Absolutely Fried With Nuclear Radiation From Fukushima.

October 27, 2013 1 comment

By Michael Snyder, October 21st, 2013    Find Full Article Here:-   http://thetruthwins.com/archives/28-signs-that-the-west-coast-is-being-absolutely-fried-with-nuclear-radiation-from-fukushima

Fukushima Radiation

The map above comes from the Nuclear Emergency Tracking Center.  It shows that radiation levels at radiation monitoring stations all over the country are elevated.  As you will notice, this is particularly true along the west coast of the United States.  Every single day, 300 tons of radioactive water from Fukushima enters the Pacific Ocean.  That means that the total amouont of radioactive material released from Fukushima is constantly increasing, and it is steadily building up in our food chain.  Ultimately, all of this nuclear radiation will outlive all of us by a very wide margin.  They are saying that it could take up to 40 years to clean up the Fukushima disaster, and meanwhile countless innocent people will develop cancer and other health problems as a result of exposure to high levels of nuclear radiation.  We are talking about a nuclear disaster that is absolutely unprecedented, and it is constantly getting worse.  The following are 28 signs that the west coast of North America is being absolutely fried with nuclear radiation from Fukushima…

1. Polar bears, seals and walruses along the Alaska coastline are suffering from fur loss and open sores

Wildlife experts are studying whether fur loss and open sores detected in nine polar bears in recent weeks is widespread and related to similar incidents among seals and walruses.

The bears were among 33 spotted near Barrow, Alaska, during routine survey work along the Arctic coastline. Tests showed they had “alopecia, or loss of fur, and other skin lesions,” the U.S. Geological Survey said in a statement.

2. There is an epidemic of sea lion deaths along the California coastline…

At island rookeries off the Southern California coast, 45 percent of the pups born in June have died, said Sharon Melin, a wildlife biologist for the National Marine Fisheries Service based in Seattle. Normally, less than one-third of the pups would die.   It’s gotten so bad in the past two weeks that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration declared an “unusual mortality event.”

3. Along the Pacific coast of Canada and the Alaska coastline, the population of sockeye salmon is at a historic low.  Many are blaming Fukushima.

4. Something is causing fish all along the west coast of Canada to bleed from their gills, bellies and eyeballs.

5. A vast field of radioactive debris from Fukushima that is approximately the size of California has crossed the Pacific Ocean and is starting to collide with the west coast.

6. It is being projected that the radioactivity of coastal waters off the U.S. west coast could double over the next five to six years.

7. Experts have found very high levels of cesium-137 in plankton living in the waters of the Pacific Ocean between Hawaii and the west coast.

8. One test in California found that 15 out of 15 bluefin tuna were contaminated with radiation from Fukushima.

9. Back in 2012, the Vancouver Sun reported that cesium-137 was being found in a very high percentage of the fish that Japan was selling to Canada…

• 73 percent of mackerel tested

• 91 percent of the halibut

• 92 percent of the sardines

• 93 percent of the tuna and eel

• 94 percent of the cod and anchovies

• 100 percent of the carp, seaweed, shark and monkfish

10. Canadian authorities are finding extremely high levels of nuclear radiation in certain fish samples…

Some fish samples tested to date have had very high levels of radiation: one sea bass sample collected in July, for example, had 1,000 becquerels per kilogram of cesium.

11. Some experts believe that we could see very high levels of cancer along the west coast just from people eating contaminated fish

“Look at what’s going on now: They’re dumping huge amounts of radioactivity into the ocean — no one expected that in 2011,” Daniel Hirsch, a nuclear policy lecturer at the University of California-Santa Cruz, told Global Security Newswire. “We could have large numbers of cancer from ingestion of fish.”

12. BBC News recently reported that radiation levels around Fukushima are “18 times higher” than previously believed.

13. An EU-funded study concluded that Fukushima released up to 210 quadrillion becquerels of cesium-137 into the atmosphere.

14. Atmospheric radiation from Fukushima reached the west coast of the United States within a few days back in 2011.

15. At this point, 300 tons of contaminated water is pouring into the Pacific Ocean from Fukushima every single day.

Categories: Environment, Government, Health

CDC Finally Admits the Age of Antibiotics is Finished as Super-Bacteria Take Over.

By    6th October 2013.   Find Article Here:-  http://naturalsociety.com/threat-report-cdc-admits-age-antibiotics-over-super-bacteria/

Many of us have come to mistrust government agencies like the FDA, and CDC, but in a startling moment of truth, the CDC now openly admits that antibiotic prescriptions have led to the death of more than 23,000 Americans every year and the calamitous emergence of super bugs that are impervious to our scientific ‘medicines.’ Even the 23,000 annual deaths is being called conservative by the CDC in a new Threat Report 2013 being issued by the agency.

Within these pages the true epidemic of antibiotic resistant  superbugs is outlined as well as a quantifiable look at the way antibiotics have been misused and over-prescribed in a Big Pharma-run world.

The report even goes so far as to admit that modern medicine has failed when it comes to managing infectious disease since Mother Nature always adapts to overcome isolated chemical weaponry concocted in some lab. Ever-newer strains of bacteria are developed to out-whit us. Super bugs are like expert hackers figuring out how to get past the best computer programmer’s firewall, as we still utilize medical programming that originated in the 1950s.

Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the CDC, said in the report, “If we are not careful, we will soon be in a post-antibiotic era” – this has huge ramifications for the current medical system. If doctors and hospitals can’t treat us with prescription drugs, what exactly is their use? We already know that things like cancer and heart disease can be resolved with natural medicine – now even a common infection will need to be treated alternatively.

The CDC says the following three superbugs are the major threat now:

  • Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae or CRE (9,000 annual infections, 600 annual deaths)
  • Antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea (246,000 infections per year, now only one drug left to treat it)
  • Clostridium difficile (250,000 infections per year, 14,000 deaths)

Fortunately, most herbal antibiotics are completely unaffected by super bugs and continue to work since they are integrated into Mother Nature’s overall plan, and have been for centuries. Many traditionally trained doctors have no idea how to prescribe herbal remedies, because they are taught from their first days in medical school to look at everything through the Big Pharma lense.

Many doctors have no clue that silver, copper, aloe vera gel, garlic, cruciferous vegetables, turmeric, lavender, astragalus, and a myriad other natural medicines from cultures around the world have been handling bacteria and viruses for millennia. Here is more information on just 5 natural antibiotics for antibiotic-resistant infections.

It may be an abject failure for the medical establishment, but it is an outright win for natural health. Finally, people will be forced to turn to other methods of dealing with chemical and environmental toxins, super bugs, and heavy metals that run rampant in our society.

The CDC’s Lame Excuse for a Solution

Unfortunately, while the CDC admits the gross failure of antibiotics, their solution is to get more people vaccinated. Considering the vaccines make the immune system weaker, and have been known to cause everything from Autism to dementia, this is not a wise piece of advice – though it is expected. Vaccines also won’t prevent the spread of super bugs. It isn’t time to look for another chemical to treat the problem. Microbiological road blocks would surely rise the minute a new chemical is introduced – the same way that it has with the creation of super bugs. It is time to look at natural solutions.

As Einstein once said, you can’t solve a problem with the same mind that created it. Treating the world for disease won’t happen in a scientists lab, brewing up another concoction of chemicals that Big Pharma can patent and then promote, all while killing thousands of people every year. Its time for a natural revolution to deal with the CDC’s admittance that the current medical model has been less than successful.

Categories: Environment, Government, Health

Japan asks international community to help solve Fukushima crisis.

By Danielle Demetriou in Tokyo 7th October 2013.  Find Article Here:-

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/japan/10359894/Japan-asks-international-community-to-help-solve-Fukushima-crisis.html

Japan’s prime minister has appealed to the international community to help fix the on-going crisis at its damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant.

Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan

Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan Photo: AP

 Shinzo Abe, the prime minister, confirmed that Japan was open to receiving assistance from overseas in a bid to help resolve the world’s worst nuclear crisis in decades.

“We are wide open to receive the most advanced knowledge from overseas to contain the problem,” said Mr Abe, during a speech made in English at a science forum in Kyoto. “My country needs your knowledge and expertise.”

His comments were made against a backdrop of on-going technical issues, with operators confirming that the latest mishap was an accidental power cut stopping pumps used to inject water to cool damaged reactors.

The incident occurred when a worker carrying out system inspections accidentally pushed a button which switched off power to some of the systems within the four reactor buildings.

Although a backup system was implemented immediately, the accident is the latest in a spate of high-profile problems at the plant, which is currently in the sensitive early stages of a decades-long decommissioning process.

Other issues relate to the contamination of groundwater with radioactive leakages which has been seeping into the Pacific since the reactors melted down shortly after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami.

The issue of how to dispose of vast quantities of contaminated water, used for critical cooling purposes, has also been top of the agenda at the plant, where further leakages have been reported from hastily-built storage tanks.

Japan has faced widespread criticism for its handling of the disaster, in particular its perceived hesitancy in taking decisive action and accepting foreign assistance in resolving the on-going technical problems.

However, with the seven year countdown to Tokyo’s 2020 Olympic Games underway, the government is showing tentative signs that it is increasingly open to foreign assistance.

Testimony to this was the recent establishment of an organisation among major utilities and nuclear experts, including advisors from the UK, France and Russia, in order to discuss decommissioning.

Categories: Environment, Health

US biologist discovers new species up his nose after research trip to Africa.

By  James Vincent  4th October 2013.      Find Article Here:-

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/us-biologist-discovers-new-species-up-his-nose-after-research-trip-to-africa-8859600.html

Nasal surprise led to discovery of new method of spreading disease from chimps to humans.

Tony Goldberg, a US professor of pathobiological science, recently returned from an Africa research trip only to discover that a potentially new species of tick had come back with him hidden up his nose.

“When you first realize you have a tick up your nose, it takes a lot of willpower not to claw your face off,” said Goldberg, a professor at the UW-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine. “But my sense of being grossed out was balanced by my scientific curiosity.”

Goldberg only noticed the insect three days after his return to the US and removed the insect using a pair of forceps, a mirror and a torch. He then sent it off to have its DNA sequenced and compared it with the archives in the U.S. National Tick Collection at Georgia Southern University (home to the largest tick collection in the world). He found no match.

“Either it’s a species of tick that is known but has never been sequenced, or it’s a new species of tick,” said Goldberg to Science Daily..

Even more remarkably, the discovery helped Goldberg fashion a new theory in his area of study: the spread of disease in primates, and how these disease evolve and cross over to humans.

After finding and removing the tick Goldberg contacted Richard Wrangham, a professor of biological anthropology at Harvard University, to find out more about his experience.

Wrangham directed him to a series of high resolution photos of baby chimpanzees. 20 per cent of these showed the young chimps with ticks up their nose – a phenomenon that had not been remarked upon before.

These ticks, from the genus Amblyomma (the same genus to which the tick up Goldberg’s nose belonged) are known disease-carriers, with the nose being their favourite haunt. Chimpanzees are frequent social groomers, removing parasites from each other’s fur as a bonding ritual, but they seldom check noses.

Goldberg’s discovery that these ticks also attempted to leap over to human nostrils was an insight into what he describes as “an underappreciated, indirect, and somewhat weird way in which people and chimps share pathogens.”

And although Goldberg has been studying the chimpanzees of Kibale National Park in Uganda for years, he’s not surprised to have not  identified the ticks before.

“It’s not really practical or safe to pick ticks out of chimps’ noses,” said Goldberg. “The chimps of Kibale are very well habituated to humans, but they would still object vigorously.”

The Violent Side Effects of Antidepressants that Many Ignore.

By Dr. Mercola  Waking Times   3rd October 2013.

Find Full Article Here:-  http://www.wakingtimes.com/2013/10/03/violent-side-effects-antidepressants-many-ignore/

Flickr - Anti-Depressant - Carsten Schertzer

In light of a long list of mass shootings over the past several years, the causative role of psychiatric drugs in violent events will undoubtedly have to be evaluated and addressed at some point. Personally, I’d vote for sooner, rather than later.

Antidepressants in particular have a well-established history of causing violent side effects, including suicide and homicide.  In a recent Scientific American1article, the author states:

“Once again, antidepressants have been linked to an episode of horrific violence. The New York Times2 reports that Aaron Alexis, who allegedly shot 12 people to death at a Navy facility in Washington, DC, earlier this week, received a prescription for the antidepressant trazodone3 in August.”

The drug in question, trazodone, has been associated with:4

“New or worsening depression; thinking about harming or killing yourself, or planning or trying to do so; extreme worry; agitation; panic attacks; difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep; aggressive behavior; irritability; acting without thinking; severe restlessness; and frenzied abnormal excitement.”

The naval yard shooting is just the latest event to bring questions about prescription medications to the fore, but it bears noting that in this particular case no evidence has yet been released confirming that the shooter had the drug in his system at the time of the massacre.

Still, questions about the safety, or lack thereof, of antidepressants and other psychiatric drugs really need to be addressed regardless of whether they were instrumental in this particular case. Just last year, a Canadian judge ruled that a teenage boy murdered his friend because of the effects of Prozac.

When will such side effects be taken seriously? Just how many people have to kill themselves or others before a drug is considered too dangerous to be prescribed?

In a paper titled Antidepressants and Violence: Problems at the Interface of Medicine and Law,5 David Healy, a British professor of psychiatry at Cardiff University and an authority on side effects of psychiatric drugs, writes:

 “Legal systems are likely to continue to be faced with cases of violence associated with the use of psychotropic drugs, and it may fall to the courts to demand access to currently unavailable data. The problem is international and calls for an international response.”

Potential Side Effects of Antidepressants = Violence and Worsened Depression

In 2004, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) revised 6 the labeling requirements for antidepressant medications (SSRI’s and others), warning that:

“Antidepressants increased the risk compared to placebo of suicidal thinking and behavior (suicidality) in children, adolescents, and young adults in short-term studies of major depressive disorder (MDD) and other psychiatric disorders.

Anyone considering the use of [Insert established name] or any other antidepressant in a child, adolescent, or young adult must balance this risk with the clinical need.”

These labeling revisions were in large part driven by lawsuits, in which pharmaceutical companies were forced to reveal previously undisclosed drug data.

For example, a civil lawsuit filed in 20047 charged GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) with fraud, claiming the drug manufacturer hid results from studies on Paxil showing the drug did not work in adolescents and in some cases led to suicidal ideation. Rather than warning doctors of such potential side effects, GSK actually encouraged them to prescribe the drug to teens and children.

According to DrugWatch.com,8 GSK has agreed to pay out more than $1 billion to settle more than 800 different lawsuits related to Paxil—and that’s over and above the $3 billion it agreed to pay to settle the Department of Justice’s investigation into illegal marketing of Paxil and other drugs!

In an effort to gather the necessary data on adverse side effects, Healy and other healthcare experts have formed an organization called RxISK.9 It’s a free, independent website where patients, doctors, and pharmacists can report side effects and research prescription drugs of all kinds. I’d encourage you to bookmark it and refer to it when needed.

Categories: Health